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WHY FINANCIAL LITERACY SHOULD BE TAUGHT IN SCHOOLS

Updated: Feb 22


financial literacy for kids

Financial education is a vital life skill, yet it's often overlooked in traditional school curricula. This is why at KidVestors, we believe financial education should be an integral part of classroom learning.


WHY FINANCIAL LITERACY SHOULD BE TAUGHT IN SCHOOLS: THE BENEFITS


When children are not taught financial literacy an early age, this could lead to expensive consequences due to financial mistakes that could have been avoided.


  1. Empowering Future Adults: Financial education equips students with the skills and knowledge they need to navigate the complex financial world as adults. They learn about budgeting, saving, investing, and debt management. These skills are essential for making informed decisions, ensuring financial stability, and achieving their goals.

  2. Breaking the Cycle of Debt and Poverty: Without financial education, individuals are more likely to fall into the trap of debt and poverty. Teaching financial literacy in schools can help break this cycle, as students learn how to manage their finances effectively, avoid costly mistakes, and build a stable financial future.

  3. Confidence and Independence: Financial education empowers students with the confidence to take control of their financial lives. They can set goals, create budgets, and make informed decisions without relying solely on external financial advice. This self-reliance is invaluable as they transition into adulthood.

  4. Enhancing Economic Resilience: A financially educated population is better prepared to weather economic challenges. During times of crisis, such as recessions or pandemics, individuals with a strong understanding of personal finance can adapt more effectively, mitigating the impact on their financial well-being.


Not to mention that students in underserved communities are disproportionately affected by the absence of financial education in schools. What are those negative effects you ask?


  1. Debt and Financial Instability: A lack of financial education can lead to debt and financial instability. Without understanding the consequences of high-interest loans or the benefits of saving, individuals are more likely to fall into financial traps that can be difficult to escape.

  2. Economic Disparities: The absence of financial education exacerbates economic disparities. Those who lack access to financial education often end up paying more for financial products and missing out on investment opportunities. This perpetuates income inequality and contributes to the wealth gap.

  3. Retirement Crisis: Without financial education, many individuals fail to adequately save for retirement. This can lead to a retirement crisis, where older adults are financially unprepared for their later years, increasing the burden on social safety nets.

  4. Poor Financial Decision-Making: Not teaching financial literacy means that individuals may make poor financial decisions that affect their lives for years. This includes not understanding the implications of taking on too much debt, making unwise investment choices, or not saving for emergencies.


The Impact on Underserved Communities

Underserved communities, often predominantly consisting of people of color, are disproportionately affected by the lack of financial education in schools. Here's how:

  1. Limited Access to Financial Resources: These communities may have limited access to financial resources and face systemic barriers to financial success. As a result, financial education is even more critical to empower individuals within these communities to make informed decisions.

  2. Higher Rates of Debt: Without proper financial education, individuals in underserved communities are more likely to accumulate high-interest debt, further deepening financial inequalities.

  3. Reduced Wealth Accumulation: The lack of financial knowledge can hinder wealth accumulation. Without understanding the benefits of saving and investing, individuals in these communities may miss out on opportunities to build generational wealth.

  4. Limited Entrepreneurial Success: Financial literacy is essential for aspiring entrepreneurs. Without it, individuals may struggle to access capital, manage business finances, and grow their businesses, limiting economic growth in these communities.



States Requiring Financial Education in Schools


Thankfully, several U.S. states have already gotten on board by recognizing the importance of financial education and have also taken steps to integrate it into their school curricula.


*Please note that the status of financial education requirements may have changed since this post was published. We strongly advise you to check with your state's Department of Education for the most current information on financial education mandates. Additionally, while some states may require financial education as a standalone course, others provide flexibility in how it can be integrated into the curriculum, allowing schools to offer it as an elective within existing courses.


  1. Alabama: Alabama mandates that financial education be taught as a standalone course.

  2. Idaho: Idaho requires a one-semester standalone course in personal finance for high school students.

  3. Kentucky: Kentucky requires a standalone course in financial literacy for high school students.

  4. Louisiana: Louisiana mandates that financial literacy be taught as a standalone course.

  5. Missouri: Missouri has a standalone personal finance education requirement for high school students.

  6. Nevada: Nevada requires that financial literacy is taught as a standalone course.

  7. Tennessee: Tennessee mandates a standalone course in personal financial literacy for high school students.

  8. Texas: Texas requires a standalone course in personal financial literacy for high school students as a graduation requirement.


States Requiring Financial Education as an Elective:

  1. Arizona: Arizona mandates personal finance education as an elective course for high school students.

  2. Georgia: Georgia requires that financial literacy instruction be provided in high school economics courses as an elective.

  3. Illinois: Illinois mandates personal finance education as part of the required high school curriculum, which can be offered as an elective.

  4. Kansas: Kansas requires personal financial literacy as part of the state's high school graduation requirements, with flexibility in how it's delivered.

  5. New Jersey: New Jersey mandates that personal finance education is included in the curriculum for high school students, which can be offered as an elective.

  6. North Carolina: North Carolina requires that economics and personal finance education be taught in high school as an elective.

  7. Oklahoma: Oklahoma mandates that personal financial literacy education is integrated into the high school curriculum, and it can be offered as an elective.

  8. Rhode Island: Rhode Island requires that personal finance education be part of the high school curriculum, which can be offered as an elective.

  9. Utah: Utah has a financial literacy mandate for high school students, with flexibility in delivery, including the option to offer it as an elective.

  10. Virginia: Virginia requires students to complete a financial literacy course as part of their high school graduation requirements, and it can be offered as an elective.

  11. West Virginia: West Virginia mandates that personal finance education be taught as part of the high school curriculum, which can be offered as an elective.


Financial education is a critical life skill that should be taught in schools for the benefit of all students, regardless of their background. It empowers individuals to make informed financial decisions, break the cycle of debt and poverty, and contribute to a more economically resilient society.


So, here are some steps that you as an advocate, educator, or parent can take right now to incorporate financial literacy into your classrooms:


The absence of financial education can lead to negative financial outcomes, exacerbate economic disparities, and have lasting consequences on individuals' lives.

In underserved communities, the need for financial education is even more pronounced, as it can help address systemic economic inequalities. This is why it is our mission to pursue "Financial Inclusion For All" as we strive for a more financially inclusive society. It's essential for us to advocate for financial education in schools and support the states that are taking steps to make it a reality.


Empowering students with financial knowledge today ensures a more prosperous and financially secure future for all.



 

FINANCIAL EDUCATION & INVESTING FOR KIDS AND TEENS







 
  • Enroll your student in our financial literacy course and app here.  

  • Subscribe to KidVestors TV 

  • If your school or group is looking for a finance curriculum to teach your students about how to manage money, start here to learn more on how to bring KidVestors to your classrooms!

  • Parents, teach your kids money and make money conversations normal in your household by visiting here.



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